Shohin Bonsai: Crafting Amazing Miniature Trees

  • By: Josh Koop
  • Date: March 4, 2022
  • Time to read: 6 min.

Shohin means “little thing,” implying that it is even smaller than Bonsai. Although no formal regulations have ever been established, a tree is termed a Shohin Bonsai if it is less than 10″ (25cm) tall. what is therefore a Shohin bonsai?

Shohin Bonsai is the art of training miniature bonsai trees. We take the same trees we use for regular Bonsai and shrink them even more. It is believed that if you measure the height of a Shohin tree properly; you should be able to hold it in one hand. 

How to grow a Shohin bonsai tree?

The difficulty and art of Shohin Bonsai are to create a miniature representation of a fully matured tree. When the quantity of dirt it’s growing in can fit into the palm of your hand, this isn’t easy. 

The bonsai trainer must understand how the tree will react to each cut. This will enable them to create a little tree that appears old and mature.

Shohin Bonsai are trained similarly as Shohin Bonsai but on a smaller scale. You’ll just have a few branches and leaves to work with most of the time. Because you can’t immediately chop something off if you don’t like it, this offers very little room for error. 

These trees are also kept in a pot that is much smaller than a bonsai pot. Pots are occasionally as little as a shot glass.

Because they are in such small pots, they require even more care than other bonsai plants. They require frequent watering, usually more than once a day, to keep the minimal quantity of soil moist. They’ll also need to be repotted more frequently because the tree will quickly get rootbound.

Maintenance pruning will need to be done weekly. Otherwise, the tree will quickly grow too large. To keep the limbs from becoming too huge, new growth must be pulled back.

Bonsai Care for Shohin and Mame (miniatures)

The upkeep of Shohin and Mame bonsai is more difficult than that of your other Bonsai. Their little pots dry out considerably faster. Unless you pick up the trees individually, it’s much more difficult to see bugs.

Because even one new leaf can make a difference in the design, they need to be pruned more frequently. A larger bonsai tree may tolerate full light, although a little bonsai tree of the same species may require some shade.

Windy days are particularly hazardous. First and foremost, the wind may dry up the plants faster than you anticipate. Second, little Bonsai are more likely to fall.

Why does the size of the Bonsai affect where the benches are placed?

Heat is reflected away from your trees by concrete, gravel, and other hard surfaces.

With extremely few trees, a grassy lawn may be a preferable choice for installing chairs.

Raise your benches higher than you would for larger Bonsai. You’ll be able to see the small Bonsai better and reach them more easily. Also, keep in mind that they require breathing room despite their small size. Allow them to sit on the benches without touching each other.

Shohin Bonsai has a unique technique.

Miniature Bonsai require more frequent watering than you may expect because of their small stature. Several times a day, at times.

Miniature Bonsai should be kept wet and upright by placing them in a bed of sand or fine pebbles.

Because the roots will grow through the bottom of the container if you employ this method, it’s vital to pick up your miniatures from time to time.

Miniature Bonsai Watering Tips

It is recommended to water bonsai from the top with a fine spray from a garden hose. Make sure you go through the process twice or three times. (If you don’t have a lot of trees, a watering can suffice.)

If you come across a small tree that hasn’t been watered in a while, “dunk” it! Allow it to soak for a long time.

You should keep a small dish of water is on hand in case of an emergency.

If you have a large group of Shohin and Mame, divide them into categories based on their preferences; maintain damp wet, and dry out a little (such as pines and jade varieties.)

Tools used in a Shohin miniature bonsai tree

You shouldn’t go out and buy a bunch of tools. Still, if you’re serious about Shohin, there are a couple of tools that are strongly recommended you invest in because they’ll make styling them so much easier. Your tree will likely reflect this because sometimes, we neglect a task that needs to be done. After all, it’s so time-consuming.

The following are the suggestions, in order of significance.

  • Mini Bonsai Scissors, 122mm Kaneshin Because of their size and long cutting edge, these scissors were created for working on Shohin trees. They allow you to get up and personal with these small trees.
  • Concave Branch Cutters by Kenshin, 165mm These smaller branch cutters are ideal for pruning Shohin trees. The rounded blade on this tool combines the functions of a standard branch cutter and a knob cutter in one cut.
  • Branch Cutters, Kaneshin, 170mm It’s a great tool to have no matter what size tree you have, but it’s especially good for Shohin trees.
  • Knob Cutters by Kaneshin, 150mm Perfect for removing the last bit of material after removing a branch, ensuring that the wound heals properly and smoothly.
  • 132mm Kaneshin Scissors and Wire Cutter Set This is a fantastic tool in terms of cost-effectiveness. It includes integrated wire cutting, making it ideal for trimming operations on Shohin and smaller Bonsai in general. This cuts down on the number of times you have to put one tool down, another up, down again, up again, and so on.
  • Tweezer and Trowel in One Kaneshin Bonsai Kaneshin Bonsai Kaneshin Bonsai Kaneshin Bonsai Kane A good pair of bonsai tweezers is extremely useful. Pinch our spring growth tips, pull weeds, and pluck needle and scale foliage with them. The other side can be used to press down dirt and moss while repotting.

What is the display nature of Shohin Bonsai? 

The Shohin Bonsai is the best size for the indoor display of any bonsai. They can easily fit into most mantles, coffee tables, and even the dining room table because of their size. Also, they can draw a lot of attention and generate a lot of conversation in this temporary employment.

Shohin is frequently used to represent seasons, particularly when used to complement a bigger bonsai in a more professional tokonoma presentation. 

Fruiting, flowering, and deciduous trees in general, especially when in leaf in the autumn, are all attractive in this area. Evergreens give any display a sense of continuity and timelessness.

The Shohin Bonsai is the best size for the indoor display of any bonsai. They can easily fit into most mantles, coffee tables, and even the dining room table because of their size. They can draw a lot of attention and generate a lot of conversation in this temporary employment.

Shohin is frequently used to represent seasons, particularly when used to complement a bigger bonsai in a more professional tokonoma presentation. Fruiting, flowering, and deciduous trees in general, especially when in leaf in the autumn, are all attractive in this area. Evergreens give any display a sense of continuity and timelessness.

Conclusion

Shohin, unlike the more typically sized Bonsai, may be styled in a shorter amount of time, allowing people who lack the patience to work on a few Shohin while waiting for their larger trees to develop. But be careful, because you can become entirely absorbed in them!

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